Aug 19, 2019  
2018-2019 Law School Student Handbook 
    
2018-2019 Law School Student Handbook [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

JD First Year Required

  
  
  
  
  
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    LAW - 710 Criminal Law


    3 unit(s)
    This course focuses on the study of substantive criminal law. It examines the rules of conduct for major crimes against persons and property and the defenses to such crimes. The course also considers the development of and philosophical rationales for criminal law.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 715 Property


    4 unit(s)
    This survey of interests in land covers possession versus ownership, forms of ownership, modern landlord-tenant law, restrictions on the use of land through easements and restrictive covenants, regulation of land use, and fair housing law. The course also considers constitutional issues such as taking property without just compensation, infringements on freedom of association, and exclusion of minorities and the poor.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 720 Torts


    4 unit(s)
    This introductory course considers the elements of and defenses to intentional torts, negligence and strict liability, including liability for defective products. The legal principles in each subject area and the policies underlying them are extensively analyzed and explored.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 725A Writing and Research I


    2 unit(s)
    In this process-based course, students begin working with the basic legal research resources. They become familiar with legal citation, legal reading and legal analysis. They develop their ability to formulate research plans and to analyze legal issues as they research and write predictive memoranda responding to specific legal problems.


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JD First Year Elective

  
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    LAW - 706A Lawyering: Asylum Law


    2 unit(s)
    This course aims to introduce students to the practice of asylum law. The class will provide students with a basic understanding of the requirements and procedures for obtaining asylum. During the course, students will develop specific legal skills such as handling client interviews, drafting declarations and conducting direct examinations. In addition, the course will involve consideration of issues that arise in legal practice, including working with translators and managing client expectations. This course is open only to first-year JD students.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 706B Lawyering: Hot Topics in Business Bankruptcy Practice


    2 unit(s)
    A business has been a center of its community for decades, but now it’s struggling - global competition, a defective product, a faltering economy, changes in management, have taken a toll. Thousands of jobs hang in the balance. Will the company survive? In this course, students will be introduced to the options and strategic decisions that a business entity facing financial stress may encounter. The course will have four components: first, we will explore basic concepts of business finance in an effort to recognize financial distress; second, negotiations among the students will determine whether the business can survive outside of bankruptcy; third, a simple drafting exercise; and fourth, oral argument will introduce the students to the bankruptcy court’s fast-paced motions practice and help determine whether the business can survive in bankruptcy. This course is open only to first-year JD students.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 706C Lawyering: Environmental Law


    2 unit(s)
    This course will explore the legal issues relating to private, non-governmental persons or entities seeking to enforce federal environmental laws prohibiting air pollution. Students will become familiar with constitutional and statutory requirements for federal enforcement, the core substantive strategies in the federal clean air act and various litigation skills. The course will utilize readings of cases and federal statutes and regulations as well as various exercises to develop practice skills including the drafting of legal documents, alternative dispute resolution and advocacy. This course is open only to first-year JD students.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 706D Lawyering: Ethics in Criminal Justice


    2 unit(s)
    This course explores the minefield of ethical dilemmas facing prosecutors and defense attorneys in practice. Initially we will study the rules governing the conduct of prosecutors and defenders in their respective roles which set an ideal standard of behavior for lawyers in criminal practice. We will then examine some of the real world pressures that affect the practice (e.g. race and cultural barriers; the competitive nature of trial work; limited resources) through the lens of a realistic fact pattern. Students will identify some of the major flaws of the criminal justice system, and will learn how those problems challenge a lawyer’s twin obligations to be both effective and ethical. Working in teams of prosecutors and defenders (and switching roles at various points in the semester), students will integrate their theoretical understanding of the issues through various mock trial exercises in which they will hone their interviewing, counseling and negotiation skills. The values of the profession that this course examines are: the provision of competent representation and concepts of justice, fairness and morality. This course is open only to first-year JD students.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 706E Lawyering: Free Exercise of Religion: Current Religious Conflicts


    2 unit(s)
    This two unit course takes a deep dive into the Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment with a focus on how defending the “First Freedom” conflicts with other civil rights in the modern era. Students will learn the tools to prepare and submit amicus briefs in state and federal courts as well as submit comment letters to executive agencies on matters affecting the exercise of religion.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 706F Lawyering: Ecommerce and Product Counseling


    2 unit(s)
    This course will focus on legal and policy considerations related to e-commerce and consumer protection, and will allow students to develop practical lawyering skills from an in-house counsel perspective. With financial services as a use case, this course will cover topics such as FTC and CFPB guidance, UDAAP risks, privacy considerations, consumer consent, transmission of payments and best practices for mobile app user interfaces. We will also analyze novel e-commerce questions applicable to all industries, including biometric authentication. Students will have an opportunity to practice fundamental skills, including product counseling, problem solving and drafting terms of use and privacy policies.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 706I Lawyering: International Law


    2 unit(s)
    This course explores the international law system, and in particular the human rights system, from a critical perspective. It focuses on the challenges and dilemmas faced by the different actors who participate in these systems, including victims, witnesses, judges, lawyers, and representatives of national institutions, international organizations, NGOs and civil society organizations. Over the course of the semester, students will confront realistic but simulated situations and problems faced by the different actors; and they will conduct simulated lawyering exercises assuming the roles of lawyers working for the organizations involved. This course is open only to first-year JD students.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 706J Lawyering: Youth Law


    2 unit(s)
    This course will introduce students to youth law in California with an emphasis on the intertwined systems of dependency, delinquency and education. Topics will include the competing interests of the State, parents and juveniles whenever children and families interact with government systems and institutions, and the sources of law and procedure governing those interactions. The course is meant to present a realistic picture of how attorneys, judges, and other professionals become involved in the lives of children as well as the myriad ethical issues arising in representation of juveniles. Students will explore each of the major phases of a typical representation including initial client interviews, negotiations, oral argument, and document drafting. This course is open only to first-year JD students.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 706T Lawyering: Trade Secret Protection & Litigation


    2 unit(s)
    Trade secrets are an important-yet often overlooked-type of intellectual property that are important to virtually all businesses, especially in the Bay Area’s high-technology and biotechnology industries. This course will introduce students to the substantive law, procedure, lawyering skills, strategies, and ethics involved in a typical trade secret misappropriation case. Students will gain experience in evaluating whether a valid trade secret exists, drafting a Complaint and Answer in a litigation proceeding, conducting pretrial discovery (including depositions), and drafting and arguing a pretrial dispositive motion in a simulated case. Throughout the course, students will be guided to develop practical and critical thinking skills in performing tasks (and creating work product) typical in a trade secret misappropriation case in state or federal court. This course is open only to first-year JD students.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 706U Lawyering: US Supreme Court Litigation


    2 unit(s)
    This course will introduce students to the skills associated with working in judicial chambers and with Supreme Court advocacy. Students will learn the laws behind a select number of today’s headline-grabbing Supreme Court cases and will explore the processes by which decision-making occurs at the Court. Using actual certiorari petitions, real appellate briefs and the recordings of oral argument from the current term of the United States Supreme Court, students will practice the skills used by clerks, judges and advocates. Assignments will include writing a bench memo or one section of a judicial opinion, preparing an oral argument memorandum, conducting appellate argument as both an advocate and a justice, and attending an oral argument. This course is open only to first-year JD students.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 706V Lawyering: Landlord-Tenant Law (HLP)


    2 unit(s)
    This course will prepare HLP students for their summer real-world legal apprenticeships by teaching both the substantive law of landlord-tenant disputes and also the skills needed to use and apply the law to resolve the legal problems faced by their real clients. The course will teach students lawyering skills such as interviewing, counseling, and negotiation and to provide students with the opportunity to practice those skills in simulated exercises in preparation for their work during the summer semester, under the supervision of an experienced lawyer in real cases. The course is designed to provide students with essential feedback on their individual progress toward achieving competency in these lawyering skills. Open only to students in the Honors Lawyering Program.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 706W Lawyering: Death Penalty Appeals & Habeas Corpus Petitions


    2 unit(s)
    Students will learn the substantive law of the death penalty in California and the essential skills for both direct appeals and habeas corpus petitions. Students will engage in short assignments that are designed to introduce them to death penalty litigation, including ineffective assistance of counsel claims. Students will become familiar with statutes and rules of court in order to craft successful motions and related documents. This course is open only to first-year JD students.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 706X Lawyering: Privacy Law & Lawyering Fundamentals


    2 unit(s)
    This course provides an introduction to Privacy Law fundamentals, including issues regarding the protection of medical and financial information, with a focus on key provisions of privacy statutes and leading cases. The changing impact of technology such as cloud-based data systems is also examined. Students will learn to negotiate and draft privacy agreements, and how to resolve disputes arising from security and privacy breaches. This course is open only to first-year JD students.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 706Y Lawyering: Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)


    2 unit(s)
    Since 1967, the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) has provided the public the right to request access to records from any federal agency. It is often described as the law that keeps citizens in the know about their government. Federal agencies are required to disclose any information requested under the FOIA unless it falls under one of nine exemptions which protect interests such as personal privacy, national security, and law enforcement. At its best, it prioritizes transparency, requires accountability, and opens government files to inquiry without the need for litigation. At its worst, it overwhelms government employees, wastes taxpayer dollars, and may be used by lawyers as an unethical substitute for discovery. This lawyering skills class will use real FOIA examples to provide students the opportunity to analyze cases, write, perform internet research, apply statutes and regulations, interview, work as part of a team, and learn about this area of the law. This course is open only to first-year JD students.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 706Z Lawyering: Introduction to Litigation - 1st STEP


    2 unit(s)
    This course will prepare 1st STEP students for their summer trial and evidence program by teaching them basic trial skills necessary to become successful litigators in the courtroom. The course will teach students an overview of litigation, including the differences between civil and criminal law. Students will participate in drafting and arguing a motion, will learn to prepare and be a good witness, and begin the process of reviewing a case file and putting together a trial. Students will end the course presenting jury addresses in a mock-trial setting. The course is designed to provide students with feedback and guidance to prepare them for the intensive summer litigation program. Open only to students applying for 1st STEP.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:



JD Upper Division Required

  
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    LAW - 801A Constitutional Law I


    3 unit(s)
    Constitutional Law I examines the American constitutional system with an emphasis on judicial review, the powers and responsibilities of the three branches of the federal government, the distribution of power between federal and state governments, and substantive due process.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
  
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    LAW - 803E Criminal Procedure I


    3 unit(s)
    This survey of the basic constitutional issues underlying the criminal justice system focuses on the role of the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments in regulating police practices such as search and seizure, confessions, lineups, and right to counsel.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
  

JD CA Bar Subject

  
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    LAW - 715C Real Estate Transactions


    2 unit(s)
    The purchase of a home represents the most important financial transaction in their lives for most Americans. (It is also one of the topics most frequently covered on the bar exam.) This course goes through the steps of a real estate “deal” from beginning to end, covering the roles of brokers and attorneys, drafting of contracts, dealing with physical and title defects, closing of escrow, priorities (i.e., ranking of claims against the property), title insurance, mortgage financing, and income tax consequences. The course is a prerequisite for Real Estate Finance. This course counts toward completion of the California Bar Subject Requirement. Prerequisite(s): LAW 715 Property .


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 720G Privacy, Defamation, and Other Relational Torts


    2 unit(s)
    This course is an intensive examination of relational torts, including privacy, defamation, interference with economic relationships, interference with family relationships, and abuse of the litigation process. This course counts toward completion of the California Bar Subject Requirement. Prerequisite(s): LAW 720 Torts  4- units.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 802A Business Associations


    4 unit(s)
    This course covers the formation, financing, structure, control, and management of business associations, including corporations, partnerships, and limited liability entities. The course also examines agency principles and uniform acts related to business associations and selected provisions of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. This course counts toward completion of the California Bar Subject Requirement.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
  
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    LAW - 807 Wills and Trusts


    3 unit(s)
    A study of nontax estate planning devices, this course explores intestate succession; restrictions on the power to dispose of property; the execution and revocation of wills; and the nature, creation, modification, and termination of trusts. Future interests and perpetuities problems are also discussed. This course counts toward completion of the California Bar Subject Requirement. Prerequisite(s): LAW 715 Property .


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 808A Community Property


    2 unit(s)
    This course covers the law of California marital property. Topics include general principles of classifying marital property, management and control of community property, division of community property upon dissolution or death, and the property rights of putative or meretricious spouses. This course counts toward completion of the California Bar Subject Requirement. Prerequisite(s): LAW 715 Property .


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:



JD Upper Division Writing

  
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    LAW - 727E Advanced Legal Research


    2 unit(s)
    This course explains the structure and use of legal materials. The goal is research proficiency, especially in a virtual law library. Each student is responsible for using the various online research tools, theories, and strategies presented by the instructors to complete weekly exercises and compile a comprehensive research memorandum/guide. Hard copy and electronic resources will be compared to explore their relative strengths and weaknesses, so students can also expect to sharpen their research skills with traditional print materials. A 1-unit version of this course may be offered in the Fall or Spring term for students on Law Review or on the Environmental Law Journal (ELJ). This course is open only to upper division JD students. This course counts toward completion of the Upper Division Writing Requirement.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 732 Appellate Advocacy


    2 unit(s)
    This course builds on the writing skills developed in the first year of law school. Students prepare appellate briefs and present oral arguments in a moot court program. This course teaches written and oral advocacy in the context of a simulated appellate case file. Students will learn about the appellate process, develop research and analysis skills, prepare an appellate brief, hone critical writing skills, and present oral arguments. In addition to providing a substantial writing experience and deeper understanding of advocacy, the course prepares students to represent GGU in extramural moot court competitions. Successful participants may be invited to join the Moot Court Board. (Note: Not a JD program ‘required course’ for students starting in fall 2018 and thereafter.) This course counts toward completion of the Upper Division Writing Requirement. Prerequisite(s): LAW 725A Writing and Research I  , LAW 725B Writing and Research II .


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 801J Sex, the Supreme Court, and the Constitution


    2 unit(s)
    This course explores the legal development of American constitutional law related to sexual and reproductive activity, sexual orientation, gender identity, and sexuality generally. Over the course of the semester, each student will complete a presentation and paper on a course topic of their choosing with individual feedback from the instructor. NOTE: This is a mixed mode, online course with approximately 7 required meetings during the scheduled time. Class meetings will occur live but remotely via video conference (you will need a computer or smart phone with a camera). Attendance at the synchronous, live courses is mandatory. This course counts toward completion of the Upper Division Writing Requirement. Prerequisite(s): LAW 801A Constitutional Law I .


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 801M First Amendment Free Exercise and Religious Conflicts


    2 unit(s)
    This two-unit course will examine the major Free Exercise and Establishment Clause decisions of the United States Supreme Court (including Burwell v. Hobby Lobby and Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission ) and related legislation (especially the Religious Freedom Restoration Act), with a focus on religious exemptions from anti-discrimination laws. Other topics explored include conscience provisions, funding of religion, religious activities on campus, and political activities of religious organizations. The course includes a realistic writing project that satisfies the Upper Division Writing Requirement expected of a junior attorney at an organization advising on a matter implicating free exercise of religion. This course counts toward completion of the Upper Division Writing Requirement.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 861A Law Review Writer


    1-2 unit(s)
    Required of all Law Review members during their first year on Law Review (2 units/Fall, 1 unit/Spring). Over the course of the two semesters, each student will write a scholarly casenote or comment. During the Fall semester, 12 hours of mandatory seminar sessions will be scheduled. The total of 3 credits will be awarded at the end of the Spring term. Enrollment is limited to persons invited to join the Law Review. Membership on Law Review is determined in two ways: by first-year grades (top 10%) or through a writing competition that is held during the middle of the second semester of the first-year. This course counts toward completion of the Upper Division Writing Requirement. This course is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
  
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    LAW - 869 California Legal Research


    2 unit(s)
    This course demonstrates the structure and use of legal resources as they relate to California practice. The course goal is research proficiency, especially with electronic California legal materials. Each student is responsible for learning to use the electronic research tools, theories, and strategies presented by the instructors. Weekly exercises are assigned, and students may also be expected to complete either a semester research project or a shorter end-of-semester project to demonstrate a comprehensive grasp of research skills. Paper and online resources will be compared to reveal their respective strengths and weaknesses, so students in this class can also expect to hone their skills in researching California printed legal materials. This course counts toward completion of the Upper Division Writing Requirement.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 884 Independent Study


    1-2 unit(s)
    Students have the opportunity to do independent research under direct faculty supervision in areas of special interest. They may enroll in the project on a letter-grade or credit/no-credit basis after making arrangements to work with a faculty member and after receiving the approval of the associate dean for student services. Students must complete 60 total hours of research and writing for each unit. Unit value for the work is determined in conference with the supervising faculty member. Petition for Independent Study forms, and appropriate registration forms, are available from the registrar’s office or on the law school website. This course counts toward completion of the Upper Division Writing Requirement.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 885C Transactional Drafting


    2 unit(s)
    In this course, students will develop fundamental transactional skills inherent in all areas of law practice through negotiating, designing, drafting, and evaluating agreements, licenses, and leases. Students will study and learn: the components of agreements; the proper use of forms and boilerplate terms; how to draft precisely; how to design a deal; the importance of and how to conduct due diligence; and negotiation tactics and ethics. Working individually and in teams, students will evaluate and critique language and provisions in a range of contracts, research applicable law to ensure enforceability of key provisions, draft due diligence and deal design memos, and negotiate and draft agreements and licenses. This course counts toward completion of the Upper Division Writing Requirement.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 885G Gender Based Violence Seminar


    2 unit(s)
    Sexual violence in the home, in the public space and in the workforce is a significant problem in the United States and around the world. This is a research and writing seminar in which each student (and the professor) will engage in an in-depth legal research project resulting in a paper of publishable quality within the broad topic of gender-based violence law. Using primarily law review articles we will study current legal and social issues surrounding gender-based violence and the intersections of race, gender, ability and sexual identity. We will consider these issues under U.S. law, international law and learn how other countries address these problems. Students will hone their critical thinking, analytical and written and oral communication skills as well as their understanding of gender-based violence. This course counts toward completion of the Upper Division Writing Requirement.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:



JD Upper Division Experiential

  
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    LAW - 745N Business Negotiations


    3 unit(s)
    The course is a practical skills class which involves a semester-long simulated negotiation of a business transaction between a U.S. multinational pharmaceutical corporation and a company in a developing African nation which has a raw material necessary for a new drug. Although the fundamental purpose of the course is to convey practical lessons that are transferable to any business transaction, the course will involve a simulated negotiation between two groups of GGU students. Each team will “represent” one of the two fictional parties to the transaction for the entire semester. Teams of students will work together to produce written communications and lead live negotiations. Course instruction includes negotiations skills, possible structures for the transaction, and a financial analysis of the facts and how that information influences the structure and negotiation of the transaction. Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): LAW 802A Business Associations .


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 776C Veterans Legal Advocacy Center


    2-4 unit(s)
    Students in this multi-disciplinary on campus program will learn and practice veterans disability law and procedure and represent actual clients before the Department of Veterans Affairs. Under attorney supervision, students will engage in client interviews, attorney-client communications and relationship, evidence gathering, factual investigation, legal research, case strategy, and objective and persuasive legal writing. Students will gain practical experience in veterans and administrative law. Through direct client services, students are exposed to many issues facing indigent clients beyond their interactions with the military. Students are expected to be thoroughly prepared and zealously represent their client. After completion of the course, students will have practiced and experienced many aspects of attorney-client representation, and the undertaking of a legal matter from its initial beginnings to completion. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement. Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): LAW 776D Veterans Legal Advocacy Seminar  required.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 804T Trial Evidence and Advocacy


    5 unit(s)
    Specifically-designed for the Summer Trial and Evidence Program (1st STEP), this course combines the courses of trial advocacy and evidence in the courtroom, as well as presentation and acting techniques from a theater instructor. In the trial advocacy part, students learn the basic skills needed by every lawyer going to court: conducting a direct examination of a witness, introducing documents and physical evidence, cross-examining witnesses, making and answering objections, and preparing opening statements and closing arguments. In the evidence in the courtroom part, students learn that the rules of evidence dictate the manner of criminal and civil trials. Students will learn how arguments under the rules of evidence and evidentiary rulings play out in the courtroom. This course connects the rules of evidence and evidentiary determinations with the skills of trial advocacy. The final examination for this course is a full trial. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement. Corequisite(s): (within 1st STEP): LAW 804 Evidence .


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
  
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    LAW - 815 Alternative Dispute Resolution


    3 unit(s)
    The purpose of this course is to help students learn approaches to negotiation and conflict resolution, and to understand various dispute resolution processes, principally mediation and arbitration. Students will be exposed to simulated negotiations and mediations and will be expected to participate in exercises and to act as advocates and/or mediators. Guest lecturers may include a hostage negotiator, an aikido master, a retired superior court judge now serving as a JAMS mediator, and prominent mediators and arbitrators. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement. Prerequisite(s): LAW 700A Civil Procedure I  and LAW 700B Civil Procedure II .


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 815G Negotiation


    3 unit(s)
    In practice and in our lives - negotiation is a critical skill. This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of negotiation. Students will acquire a systematic framework for understanding negotiations, develop negotiation skills to create and distribute value through simulation exercises and discussion, and develop awareness of their strengths and opportunities for growth as a negotiator. There will be required readings for each class and a number of short written assignments related to particular classes and simulation exercises. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement. Prerequisite(s): LAW 700A Civil Procedure I  and LAW 700B Civil Procedure II .


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 823G IP Practicum: Patent Law


    2 unit(s)
    This course focuses on the primary legal and procedural requirements for preparing and prosecuting patent applications under federal law. The course is designed to introduce students to the main legal doctrines of the patent preparation and prosecution practice, as well as the strategic considerations underlying the lawyering process in this area of intellectual property law. A core component of this course is the use of simulations that require students to complete both written and oral assignments that emulate actual legal practice in patent preparation and prosecution, and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Students will receive extensive feedback on assignments in order to enhance active learning of legal skills, legal writing skills, and professional development. Among the assignments, students may practice drafting patent applications, responding to office actions, performing patentability searches, and preparing client letters. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 823P IP Practicum: Trademark & Copyright Transactions


    2 unit(s)
    This course focuses on the primary legal and procedural requirements for registering, maintaining, exploiting, and enforcing trademarks and copyrights under federal law. The course is designed to introduce students to the main legal doctrines of trademark and copyright transactional practice, as well as the strategic considerations underlying the lawyering process in these areas of intellectual property law. A core component of this course is the use of simulations that require students to complete both written and oral assignments that emulate actual legal practice in trademark and copyright prosecution, and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, and the U.S. Copyright Office. Students will receive extensive feedback on assignments in order to enhance active learning of legal skills, legal writing skills, and professional development. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement. Prerequisite(s): LAW 891 Trademark Law of the US  or LAW 823 Copyright Law of the U.S.  or LAW 823E Intellectual Property Law Survey .


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 834C Environmental Law & Justice Clinic


    2-3 unit(s)
    The Environmental Law & Justice Clinic (ELJC) is an in-house clinic, which provides students with intensive training and hands-on lawyering experience. Under close faculty supervision, students provide legal representation on matters addressing environmental justice, including enforcement of environmental laws and formulating energy justice policies. Clinic students are certified under State Bar of California rules to perform many of the tasks of an attorney: they interview clients, develop legal strategies, draft legal documents, and counsel clients. They may also appear at hearings and negotiate with opposing parties. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement. Corequisite(s): LAW 804 Evidence . Special scheduling arrangements can be made on a case-by-case basis for night students.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 837F Family Law Practice


    2 unit(s)
    This course focuses on the skills necessary to carry on a basic family law practice in California. Students prepare and argue motions, learn trial skills, and practice using the most popular computer programs for setting child support according to the detailed provisions of the Family Code. Students also develop parenting and child visitation plans, calculate spousal support, and learn various methods of dividing community property. Priority is given to graduating students. Prior completion of LAW 837A Family Law  and LAW 808A Community Property  is recommended, but not required, and may also be taken concurrently. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 842A Immigration Law


    3 unit(s)
    This introduction to immigration and naturalization law and procedure examines major immigration policies and covers immigration and naturalization statutes, regulations, major administrative and court decisions, and constitutional rights as affected by alienage. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 885B Women’s Employment Rights Clinic


    2-3 unit(s)
    Students represent low-income clients with employment-related problems in areas including unpaid wages, discrimination and harassment, pregnancy disability, family and medical leave, and unemployment benefits. The clinic operates as a law office, with students practicing under direct faculty supervision. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement. Prerequisite(s): All first-year courses. Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): LAW 804 Evidence . Corequisite(s): Clinic students must simultaneously enroll in the LAW 885S Women’s Employment Rights Seminar . Consent of the instructor is required for Clinic enrollment.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 896A Externship: Civil Field Placement


    2-8 unit(s)
    This course includes both classroom and field work components. In class, students work toward effectiveness in the field by developing skills, engaging in discussion, and reflecting on goals and performance. In the field, students practice civil litigation or transactional work at private or non-profit law offices, government agencies, or in the legal departments of businesses.

    Class meets on six Mondays from 4:30-6:10 PM. Three classes meet on campus. Three classes meet by video conference. Students may earn 2-8 credits and the class is offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

    Application required by deadline to enroll and is subject to approval by the Externships Director. The deadline is posted on the externships web page found at law.ggu.edu/clinics-and-centers/externships. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement. This course is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 896B Externship: Advanced


    2-13 unit(s)
    This course is open only to students who are repeating an externship in civil or criminal practice. It includes both classroom and field work components. In class, students build on skills developed in prior externships, engage in discussion, and reflect on progressive goals and performance. In the field, students continue their practice in criminal or civil litigation or transactional work. Fieldwork does not need to be in the same office as the previous externship.

    Class meets on six Mondays from 4:30-6:10 PM. Three classes meet on campus. Three classes meet by video conference. Students may earn 2-13 credits in fall/spring and 2-8 credits in summer.

    Application required by deadline to enroll and is subject to approval by the Externships Director. The deadline is posted on the externships web page found at law.ggu.edu/clinics-and-centers/externships. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement. This course is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 896C Externship: Judicial


    2-13 unit(s)
    This course includes both classroom and field work components. In class, students work toward effectiveness in the field by developing skills, engaging in discussion, and reflecting on goals and performance. In the field, students practice research, writing, and engage with the neutral aspect of litigation.

    Class meets on six Mondays from 4:30-6:10 PM. Three classes meet on campus. Three classes meet by video conference. Minimum G.P.A. requirements are 2.5 for state court and 2.75 for federal court. Students may earn 2-13 credits in fall/spring and 2-8 credits in summer.

    Application required by deadline to enroll and is subject to approval by the Externships Director. The deadline is posted on the externships web page found at law.ggu.edu/clinics-and-centers/externships. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement. Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): LAW 804 Evidence . This course is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 896F Externship: Criminal Litigation


    2-13 unit(s)
    This course includes both classroom and field work components. In class, students work toward effectiveness in the field by developing skills, engaging in discussion, and reflecting on goals and performance. In the field, students practice criminal litigation in private practice or government agencies.

    Class meets on six Mondays from 4:30-6:10 PM. Three classes meet on campus. Three classes meet by video conference. Students may earn 2-13 credits in fall/spring and 2-8 credits in summer.

    Application required by deadline to enroll and is subject to approval by the Externships Director. The deadline is posted on the externships web page found at law.ggu.edu/clinics-and-centers/externships. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement. Corequisite(s): LAW 804 Evidence . This course is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 896R Externship: Consumer Rights


    2 unit(s)
    This course includes both classroom and field work components held at the Justice & Diversity Center of the Bar Association of San Francisco. In class, students learn how to defend against debt-collection lawsuits. In the field, students engage in a clinical practice with attorney supervision as they advocate for clients sued by creditors.

    The classes and clinics are held on selected Wednesday evenings and also on the last Saturday of the month. Students earn 2 credits, but those who are certified by the State Bar’s Practical Training of Law Students program may petition instructor for a third credit. This course is offered in Spring and is restricted to part-time students during priority registration.

    Students may enroll directly without additional externship application via GGU4You. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement. This course is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 897A Civil Litigation: Pretrial Phase


    3 unit(s)
    In this course, students handle every aspect of the pretrial preparation of a civil lawsuit. They proceed from the initial client contact, through formulating client representational strategy, to developing a case theory. They draft all the case pleadings as well as motions challenging the sufficiency of the pleadings. Students also engage in all aspects of fact investigation. The course ends with a pre-trial settlement conference. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement. Prerequisite(s): LAW 700A Civil Procedure I  and LAW 700B Civil Procedure II .


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 897C Civil Litigation: Depositions


    2 unit(s)
    This course focuses on the practical and theoretical aspects of preparing for, taking and defending depositions in the course of litigation. Students will learn deposition strategies and questioning techniques using a variety of simulations to provide students with a wide array of contexts. The course is designed to give students continual practice and feedback in order to maximize skill-development, preparation and skills needed to handle clients, deponents and other lawyers to achieve optimal resolution of a case. Corequisite(s): LAW 804 Evidence .


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 898A Criminal Litigation


    3 unit(s)
    This course affords students the opportunity to apply the skills learned in Trial Advocacy in the context of a criminal case. The class is divided into two-person teams. Each team is assigned either the role of prosecution or defense counsel. The class usually begins with the staging of a mock crime. The crime is reported, a suspect is arrested, charges are filed, and the prosecution commences. The class proceeds, week by week, through major phases of a criminal case. The course concludes with the trial of the case, which is conducted in a local courthouse. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement. Prerequisite(s): LAW 804 Evidence , and either LAW 899B Trial Advocacy  or LAW 804T Trial Evidence and Advocacy .


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 899B Trial Advocacy


    3 unit(s)
    This is the entry course for the litigation program, and it teaches the basic skills needed by every lawyer going to court: conducting a direct examination of a witness, introducing documents and physical evidence, cross-examining witnesses, making and answering objections, and preparing opening statements and closing arguments. Much of the students’ work is videotaped. The final examination for this course is a full trial conducted in a local courthouse. This course counts toward completion of the Experiential Learning Requirement. Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): (depending on the instructor): LAW 804 Evidence .


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:



JD Elective

  
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    LAW - 743B Privacy Law


    3 unit(s)
    This course explores the genesis of and current state of the area of law commonly known as ‘data protection’ or ‘privacy’ law. We will compare approaches and requirements of various countries and regions (including where there are tensions between and among such laws), focus on privacy issues across various industry sectors, and explore options for national and international compliance, including with respect to surveillance by companies, in the workplace, and by government. We will also consider various uses of and protections as applied to privacy policies, email/spam, and children online. Students examine new and pending Internet and privacy-related legislation and its impact on business and technology. Corequisite(s): Recommended co-requisite: LAW 743 Cyberlaw 


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 743C Privacy Law & Technology


    2 unit(s)
    This course explores the current and rapidly evolving state of the area of privacy law. We will concentrate on privacy issues raised by developments in technology and explore a range of legal approaches and responses, evaluating their effectiveness, consistency, and practicability. Students examine current and emerging technologies as well as attempts at regulation to determine the effectiveness and the impact on business and technology. No prerequisites, but LAW 743 Cyberlaw  & LAW 743B Privacy Law  is recommended.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 776D Veterans Legal Advocacy Seminar


    2 unit(s)
    The Veterans Legal Advocacy Seminar provides the skills necessary to understand the practice of law, and the theory of veterans’ law. The course will supplement a student’s legal education by teaching the practical skills necessary to succeed as an attorney in multiple legal areas, while working with real life situations and clients. The course will explore what it means to be an attorney while dealing with actual clients. It teaches students the skills necessary to undertake a legal matter from the initial client meeting to the completion of the case. Skills covered include: client interviewing, attorney-client communications and relationship, evidence gathering, factual investigation, legal research, case strategy, and objective and persuasive legal writing. In class, students will engage in discussions and potential solution to veterans’ legal issues, and think critically about policy issues surrounding veterans’ disability law and military discharge upgrades. After completion of the course, students will have sharpened their legal skills and obtained the confidence and ability to represent actual clients in a variety of legal settings.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 776L Veterans Law & Policy Seminar


    2 unit(s)
    Student will enhance their knowledge of legal issues confronting military veterans and service members. Students will also enhance their research and writing skills through deconstructing existing law review articles in this area as well as engaging in in-depth research on their topic. Topics have been selected based on input from practicing attorneys who assist veterans and service members and focus on potential law and policy changes that could result in better services and support for these populations. This course counts toward completion of the Upper Division Writing Requirement.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 801E Legal Analysis


    2 unit(s)
    This course covers the elements of legal reasoning and problem solving, with an emphasis on analytical writing.

    Students required to take this class will be notified and will be automatically withdrawn from their 1L Lawyering elective course. Enrollment in Legal Analysis is by invitation only, but other students who feel that they might benefit from taking this class may apply to the Associate Dean or Director for Student Affairs for permission to add the course. This course is graded on a Credit/No Credit basis.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 802B Securities Regulation


    3 unit(s)
    This course will provide an overview of United States federal securities laws as they relate to the issuance and trading of securities in US capital markets. In particular, we will review the broad arc of the securities laws as they have evolved from Great Depression/New Deal roots through the Boesky/Milken/greenmail scandals of the 1980’s, the Enron/WorldCom crises of the 1990s and the Global Financial Crisis of 2008. Students that prepare, attend and participate will learn how and why the securities laws (1) dictate the structure of many capital raising transactions (such as private venture capital financings and initial public offerings) and M&A events, (2) regulate trading in public markets such as the NYSE and Nasdaq, and (3) influence modern corporate governance, control and strategic planning. Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): LAW 802A Business Associations .


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 802J Corporate Compliance & Ethics


    2 unit(s)
    The number and scope of corporate ethical lapses continue to escalate, as do the record-breaking fines and penalties imposed by regulators. On what basis do judges decide to punish corporations and hold the executives liable for misconduct? How do corporations create an ethical culture that will prevent, detect and deter wrongdoing? In this course, we will explore the structure of an effective compliance and ethics program, using the U.S. Federal Sentencing Guidelines as our guide. We will review how corporations effectively mitigate hot risk areas such as False Claims, Government Contracting, Data Privacy, and Anti-Corruption. This course will also explore the unique ethical and social responsibilities compliance officers face in their multiple roles as stewards of the corporation, the voice of employees, and seekers of organizational justice. This course would be invaluable to any student considering a career in the booming field of corporate compliance. Prerequisite(s): LAW 802A Business Associations 


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 803B Secured Transactions


    2 unit(s)
    This course introduces students to the Uniform Commercial Code (article 1 and article 9), to essential concepts of borrowing and lending in a credit economy, and to the ways in which lenders reduce the risk of non-payment by obtaining an interest in business and consumer borrowers’ personal property. It is strongly recommended for anyone planning to represent lenders, businesses or consumers in commercial transactions.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 804M Effective Brief Writing & Motion Advocacy


    2 unit(s)
    A judge’s first impression of a lawyer is often based on the quality of his or her papers. That impression had better be a good one. This course, taught by a superior court judge, will teach students how to effectively draft motions and argue them in a real-world setting. Utilizing a variety of fact patterns, students will develop a portfolio of written work and will receive feedback aimed at building confidence in courtroom advocacy.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 805P Practice Ready Seminar


    2 unit(s)
    This course is designed to develop your abilities to succeed as an extern and a first year attorney by simulating typical assignments and providing extensive professor feedback of your work. This course will focus on written and verbal communication skills to help you advance more quickly in your legal career and familiarize you with the types of work typically assigned to new lawyers. The professor feedback will assist you to meet and exceed the expectations of future employers. This course is a Practice Intensive (PIC) course which provides two credits towards the experiential learning requirement.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
  
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    LAW - 816A Accounting for Lawyers


    2 unit(s)
    This introductory course gives students a basic understanding of the structure of an accounting system; the mechanics of accounting entries; and the related legal, tax and business ramifications of implementing various accounting conventions and methods. Course lectures and text include discussions and cases covering generally accepted accounting principles, financial statement analysis and disclosure, auditing, choice of entity issues, and the attorney’s role in dealing with accountants, auditors, and other financial professionals.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 817B Introduction to Islamic Law


    2 unit(s)
    This course introduces students to the basic concepts of Islamic law and their applicability in contemporary legal systems. Throughout the course students will learn the history and evolution of Islamic law, development of different schools of thought, an overview of the substantive principles and comparative analyses with existing legal principles in the world. Students will also have an opportunity to explore Islamic legal systems in diverse communities, the impact of colonialism and modernity on Islamic law, and to examine the presence of Islam in today’s western societies. This course counts toward completion of the JD Upper Division Writing Requirement.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 819E Introduction to eDiscovery


    2 unit(s)
    E-Discovery or Electronic Discovery refers to the identification, collection and production of electronically stored information in response to a request for production in a law suit or investigation. The processes and technologies around eDiscovery are often complex because of the volume and dynamic nature of data. This course examines 1) the case law landscape following the 2006 amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure which were designed to foster cooperation and early discussion on issues involving electronically stored information; 2) the proposed new amendments to these same rules; and 3) the surrounding technologies and procedures required to preserve, collect, process, review and produce electronic evidence. The class will follow the chronology of the Electronic Discovery Reference Model, with interludes for guest speakers on Computer Forensics and Project Management. Prerequisite(s): LAW 804 Evidence 


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
  
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    LAW - 822A Animal Law


    2 unit(s)
    This course will introduce students to the status of animals in our legal system, substantive laws relating to animals, the use of litigation as a tool to enforce those laws. Through readings, case studies, and skills-based learning, students will gain an understanding of key elements of animal law litigation, such as standing, causes of action, and case development and strategy.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 822B Animal & Wildlife Law


    3 unit(s)
    This course begins with a discussion of the ethical bases for legal protection of individual animals and wildlife populations, focusing on where different ethical premises create conflicts over animal protection. The course then reviews several wildlife protection laws, including the Endangered Species Act, Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and California’s Fully Protected Species Statutes. Finally, the course reviews the legal protections available to individual animals, from their status of property to standing for animals to their ethical treatment in domestic, agricultural, and laboratory settings. Several of San Francisco’s unique statutes protecting animals will be reviewed, as well as recent bills proposed in Sacramento pertaining to animal and wildlife law.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 823 Copyright Law of the U.S.


    3 unit(s)
    This in-depth analysis of U.S. copyright law includes the history of the law, from the first copyright statutes through the major revisions of the 1909 Act, the 1976 Act, and the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998. Students explore legal issues relating to the registration process, defenses such as fair use and parody, and remedies for infringement. Terms for the licensing and/or transfer of copyright are also examined. Includes the impact of the use of digital media and the growth of the Internet on copyright protection. Intellectual Property LLM students are required to take this course, LAW 891 Trademark Law of the US , or LAW 875 Patent Law of the US .


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 823D Intellectual Property Litigation: Copyright and Trademark


    2 unit(s)
    This course takes students through the various stages of an intellectual property litigation case, focusing on the issues specific to litigating trademark cases and copyright cases. Infringement and breach of contract situations form the basis for study and analysis. Litigation strategies, discovery techniques, and settlement negotiation issues are also addressed. This course counts toward completion of the JD Upper Division Writing Requirement.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 823E Intellectual Property Law Survey


    3 unit(s)
    An introduction to the U.S. law of copyright, trademark, and patent, this course explores state law of trade secrets, unfair competition, and the role of IP protection of computer programs. The course is designed for students interested in focusing on IP law or in simply getting a basic understanding of the key legal principles of IP law.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 823T Trade Secrets Law


    2 unit(s)
    This course will provide students with an introduction to a specific discipline of Intellectual Property Law that has experienced spectacular growth with the advances in digital technology and the proliferation of technological entrepreneurism. The course will provide students with an understanding of what trade secrets are and why they are crucial to a business enterprise. Students will gain some practical experience in how trade secrets are protected and managed in order to facilitate their understanding of the concept of misappropriation of trade secrets. Finally, the course will allow students to become familiar with trade secret litigation (tactics and defenses), remedies for misappropriation of trade secrets, and the criminal consequences of trade secret misappropriation. The course will use a problem/case-study approach in dealing with the basics of trade secret law and the legal issues arising from the misappropriation of trade secrets. This course stresses the practical aspects of trade secret law by giving students the opportunity to produce meaningful deliverables in the same manner as they would as a junior associate in a law firm.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
  
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    LAW - 826R Business Bankruptcy


    3 unit(s)
    This course examines the rights and remedies available to a failing business and its creditors when the business seeks to reorganize under Chapter 11 of the Federal Bankruptcy Code. The course is structured as a “practicum,” which tracks a single business through restructuring, and emphasizes practical and strategic lawyering skills. This course counts toward completion of the Upper Division Writing Requirement.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 827B Venture Capital Business Transactions


    3 unit(s)
    Using the venture capital financing of a start-up company as a transactional model, this class focuses on the practical mechanics of how a business transaction is structured and implemented from term sheet to closing. The purpose of the course is to convey practical lessons that are transferable to any business transaction. Coursework covers the documentation, legal issues, business issues, and mechanical process of closing a preferred stock financing on behalf of a venture-backed start up. Previous or concurrent enrollment in LAW 802A Business Associations  is required; Recommended: prior securities law class advisable but not required. This course counts toward the Certificates of Specialization for both Business Law and Intellectual Property Law.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 829A Poverty Law


    2 unit(s)
    The primary objective of this course is to introduce students to the unique legal issues of the poor and how the legal system deals with access to justice and indigency. We will review historical and contemporary challenges facing public interest lawyers, legal problems and policy choices regarding poverty, and effective advocacy strategies. These themes will then be traced through three areas of substantive discussion: government benefit programs, housing law and homelessness, and family law. We will conclude the course with an examination of new trends in legal services. This course counts toward completion of the Upper Division Writing Requirement.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 830 Education Law Seminar


    2 unit(s)
    This course will explore the legal framework and policy controversies surrounding public education. Topics will include compulsory education; homeschooling, charter schools, vouchers and challenges to the traditional school model; the special employment status of school teachers; students’ rights of free expression; special education; student discipline; and the quest for equity in public education. For each topic, students will consider (1) the key contours of the law as it stands; (2) how the law informs the operation of the public school system; (3) what policy judgments are reflected in the current state of the law; and (4) what changes should be made to the law in order to advance worthy policy goals. Students will discover the workings of the administrative state and the relationships between constitutions, statues, case law, and executive-branch regulations. Students will explore the ways in which that multifaceted law-making process informs both our understanding of the current law as well as strategies to improve the law. This course satisfies the Upper Division Writing Requirement.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 831 Employment Law


    3 unit(s)
    This course examines the relationship between employers and individual employees. Topics include hiring, wrongful termination, employees’ duty of loyalty, restrictions on post-employment competition, workplace privacy and defamation, and protection against harassment and other abusive conduct in the workplace. The course covers substantive law and examines prevailing assumptions about the employment relationship. While the course covers some discrimination issues, it does not offer in-depth coverage of that area of law.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 832A Employment Discrimination


    3 unit(s)
    This course examines the major federal statutes prohibiting employment discrimination based on race, color, sex, sexual orientation, religion, disability, citizenship status, national origin, and age. California law regulating employment is also briefly examined. In addition to covering the substantive law, the course critically examines the law’s assumptions about the nature of the employment relationship, the definition of discrimination, and the role of the government in regulating employment.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 833 Entertainment Law


    3 unit(s)
    An introduction to the complex legal issues arising in the areas of music sound recordings and publishing, motion pictures, television, theater, and literary publishing in the United States and internationally. Covers the drafting of contracts in the entertainment industry, as well as dispute resolution alternatives. Students also study the roles of attorneys, agents and personal managers, as well as relevant legislation affecting the entertainment industry.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 833D Negotiating and Drafting Contracts in the Entertainment Business


    2 unit(s)
    This advanced course in entertainment law focuses on the drafting and negotiation of the numerous agreements involved in entertainment projects. Sound recording and publishing contracts in the music business and licensing agreements for the online distribution of music and audiovisual works are examined in detail. Students get hands-on experience in drafting these agreements. They also analyze negotiation points and discuss negotiation tips and strategies with experienced practitioners in entertainment law. LAW 833 Entertainment Law .


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 834F Federal Environmental Law & Policy


    3 unit(s)
    This course focuses on the fundamentals of Environmental Law, including the federal Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, Climate Change, the Endangered Species Act, Citizen Suits, Criminal Prosecution and the National Environmental Policy Act. Students explore federal regulatory strategies, including environmental justice, technology-based requirements, and enforcement methods, as well as alternatives to traditional regulation such as market-based mechanisms. Students also learn tools of statutory interpretation and other skills using PIC exercises and the problem method.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 834G Environmental Law & Justice Seminar


    2 unit(s)
    The ENVIRONMENTAL LAW & JUSTICE SEMINAR explores law and policy issues central to the environmental justice movement, focusing on matters that recur in the Clinic’s representation of clients who are disproportionately impacted by pollution; explores the role of lawyers and their ethical responsibility in representing clients from communities overburdened by pollution; and provides skills training that students must master to become effective lawyers, focusing on skills that are necessary for the Clinic’s caseload. The seminar is a required companion course to the LAW 834C Environmental Law & Justice Clinic , but it may also be taken by LLM students who are not enrolling in the Clinic with permission of the instructor. Such permission may be denied if the Clinic’s caseload is unsuitable for such an arrangement. Corequisite(s): LAW 834C Environmental Law & Justice Clinic .


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 834H California Environmental and Land Use Law


    3 unit(s)
    This course focuses on California constitutional provisions, California statutes and California court decisions that pertain to environmental protection, natural resources and land use regulation. Topics covered include the California Environmental Quality Act, California Coastal Act, California Forest Practices Act, California Endangered Species Act, San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission (BCDC), public trust law, surface water rights, California’s Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA), California planning and zoning law, conditional use permits and variances, regulatory takings claims related to land use restrictions, and the use of specialized mandamus lawsuits in California to challenge the decisions of local and state environmental/land use agencies. A significant portion of the grade for this course involves analysis of the Complaint and trial court briefs in an environmental lawsuit challenging portions of the California High Speed Rail project.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


  
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    LAW - 836E Equality Law Seminar


    2 unit(s)
    In this course, students will work on an in-depth research and writing project under the broad topic of equality law. Topics may include such issues as gender-based violence as well as sex, race and sexual orientation discrimination in the workplace, in education, the military and other areas. This course satisfies the Upper Division Writing requirement.


    View the Fall 2019 course schedules:


 

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